I advise you to hold off on looking at pictures until after you have read the section that the pictures correspond to. There are spoilers.

Theresienstadt Section (chapters 29-39)

My husband and I traveled to Terezín in March 2016. These are some of the pictures we took.

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Rubble and trash behind a former barracks. Much of the town is in disrepair.

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The Jewish Cemetery – only a small fraction of those who died were buried here.

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The building on the left is the Dresden Barracks where women and children were housed

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Main square

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Main square

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Main square – the building to the left was what the Germans used as their administrative building. The building on the right is a church. The date above the door is 1805.

Hannover

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Out guide, Jeri, pointing out the Dresden Barracks

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This is what was used as the hospital

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Museum display depicting a barracks room

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Heidi and Jeri, our guide

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Example of how the streets and blocks were named. Each east-west street was given an L number and each north-south street was given a Q number. Starting on the eastern edge each block is lettered A through J. Starting in the south each block is numbered I through VII.

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Heidi walking in the main square

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Statue of Empress Maria Theresa 1812. The original fortress was named after her.

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These are the walls leading into the town. They were build to keep invading armies out in the late 1700s. They also served to keep Jewish prisoners in in the 1940s.

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Model of Theresienstadt from the Ghetto Museum. I am pointing to the Dresden Barracks.